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20121204
20121204
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
cuts to go back to the clinton era rates for the wealthiest americans. maybe that means finding a really creative tax reform that eliminates deductions almost entirely for the wealthy. these are possible see teas. it's hard for me to imagine that either side is really hoping to go over the cliff at this point because they both know what it means for the economy and they are both worried about making that responsibility. at this point it doesn't make any sense to suggest that you're the one who is going to blink because that's going to put you sort of in the underposition of the negotiations. >> let me switch subjects completely because this is sort of the provocative headline. new york city mayor bloomberg called hillary clinton and said you should be my successor as mayor. how do you think that conversation went? i think being a mayor of new york city gives you an opportunity to imagine things that are possible but not in real life. i can imagine how hillary clinton would be enticed to take on that smaller stage after her staging as the nation and the world for the last decade.
syria. hillary clinton had a statement out yesterday. she's in the czech republic, and she said this. i'm not going to telegraph in any specifics what we would do in the event there's credible evidence that the assad regime has resorted to using chemical weapons against their own people, but suffice it to say we are certainly planning to take action if that eventuality were to occur. first of all, what do you think that means, specifically? and, and what should it mean? >> i think it means that it's a red line for americans and the world. if that were to happen then i would expect some form of very tough military response. >> which would be what? >> i think it would be unlikely to speculate and specify right now and that's why she's being cautious in what she said. but up to now, what the west has been doing is giving some political support to the syrian opposition, obviously trying to resolve the situation as far as is possible. it's not been possible so far. >> and every day 100 people die or more. >> there are a lot of people dying. now the death toll probably would be around 40,000
your tax system is. and it's pretty low now. you know compare it to the clinton era rates, which is kind of all we're talking about, right? going back to the clinton era rate of 39% -- >> is it about fairness? or is it about lessening the deficit? because it doesn't really do a whole lot for the debt or deficit over ten years. >> well, it's about fairness, but it's also about what are the better options? given that the wealthy are really skating by these days. and so how do you collect more revenue from them? and all the various ideas about, well, you cap this deduction, and cap that deduction. there are not only political constituencies that will fight tooth and claw on every deducti deduction, there are some reasons, fairly good reasons why you would want to think twice. you know, are you going to go after home mortgage deduction at a time when the housing industry is trying to get its feet? are you going to go after the exemption on taxation for health insurance? i mean, that's the biggest one, actually. that's like $250 billion a year. but i don't think anybody wants to dive
. stuart: i think he had a round of golf with former president bill clinton just the other day. >> yeah. stuart: and bill clinton was-- you voted for him, twice. >> i sure did, he was a good president. stuart: do you think there's they chance that some of the moderation of blirn will rub off on the leftism of president obama? >> no, i think that clinton's leverage is gone totally. he supported obama totally in the election. without clinton i don't think that obama would have been reelect and that's what he did for him. and what clinton could do in the future, i don't know. i don't know why obama is so insistent on higher tax rates except it fits his rhetoric. stuart: at the end of the day, i think that the republicans will actually submit on the issue of higher tax rates. it may be just tax rates higher for those making half a million a year, i think they'll retreat a little bit. >> i think, too, what i'd like to see the republicans do, i'd like to see them pass a bill extending tax cuts below $250,000 and everyone agrees those should be put through and then put through another bill tha
, that's something that will -- >> howard goes on and on. clinton tax rates on everybody. will it cause a problem? yeah, short recession, but we get defense cuts which republicans would never agree to otherwise, there are human service cut which is we won't like, but the least possible damage. and it's a serious down payment on the deficit. the wall street people ringing their hands are really full of it. i'm not sure what. but full of something because they're going to see a big drop on wall street but it will come roaring back because somebody has done something. so you have him and all their friends and the right and all their friends and the president who i don't think if he can ever get out of campaign mode. it's a full on campaign again. putting one party into -- >> you're right, the amt will hit more people in the middle class and raise their effective tax rate to a higher rate than they were today. and you won't -- >> you have obamacare 4% on everyone, too. >> if you lieu numerically, it doesn't make sense if one side says we're not going to race taxes on the middle class -- >>
to work, does it? but in the clinton era when the rates went up, the 39.6 from 35 , they paid a little bit more and, guess what, the income boomed. we had 3.8% unploimed. we balanced the budget -- we had 3.8% unemployment. we balanced the budget. they opposed the tax increases in 4-. they said a disaster would result. not a single republican voted for the increases in taxes that president clinton put forward, which ultimately led to a balanced budget and paying down debt for the first time in 50 years. not one of them because they said it would bring economic disaster and instead is brought prosperity. so they brought out that old broken record, they glued it back together. maybe they put it on the -- put it in a digital format or something. but they're playing it again. it's as valid now as it was then. so it's the same old plan, stick it to the middle class, stick it to the seniors and benefit the ultrawealthy in this country. that's not a new plan. that's the same old broken record. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas, mr. poe, for five minutes. mr. po
clinton and state counselors have been engaging for some time, and that is can we get a better answer than we have had in the past two how a new rise in power comes to the international system. and can we do so without running significant risks or indeed fall into conflict. >> thanks. please. >> i agree with everything the undersecretary has said your, and, in fact, admiral sam locklear underscore those pushes a couple days ago in australia. talking about engagement and that strategic trust. but it's interesting that the chinese tend to look at the american, ma asia pacific give it a sort of a continuing strategy. which speaks to the inability to really communicate with strategic effect. and i think you touched, steve, on a very important piece which was a seniority complex and if i can put it that way. china has felt that they were abused by major powers to the 19th century and well into the 20 century, and that has an interesting counterbalance, which is a seemed a bit of a superiority complex about the solutions that they are building on how china images as a global power. the disconten
president clinton was in office, he left this country in the black. the people have weighed in. they've indicated that we want to move forward, we want to put people to work but we want to do it in a fair method of doing it. and that is not cutting programs that impacts the working poor in this country. mr. garamendi: well, you're absolutely correct about that. the proposal to cut medicare benefits is a nonstarter. there are things that can be done in medicare to reduce the costs and much has already been done. i'd like to ask my colleague from the great state of michigan to join us, mr. curson is a new member, came in during a special election. welcome. delighted to have you join us. mr. curson: thank you. i agree wholeheartedly with what's been said so far and the testimony, what i really want to say -- into the mic. what i really want to say is medicare is run more efficiently than nearly any insurance company in the world. they devote less than 2% of its funding to administrative expenses, and you compare that to a private insurance company that costs up to 40% of premiums for in
breakthroughs. and i lived in d.c. the only way to make major break throughs in d.c. is do what bill clinton did and reach across the table. >> susie: you know, bond the-- beyond the fiscal cliff and i know that say big issue hanging over the markets but there are also fundamentals going on as well. we got mixed reports on the economy. tom just talked about that weak data showing businesses contracting. and we're also getting warnings on weak corporate profits. so doesn't this give you pause about buying in this market right now? >> i think, i just got back from two weeks in europe speaking to portfolio managers in seven different countries. they are profoundly underinvestmented in the u.s. the endowment funds in this country are profoundly underinvested in u.s. equities. a lot of portfolio managers are hoping equities go down as measured by the s&p so their underperformance doesn't look as bad. if the market doesn't go down here i think they will be forced to chase not end of the year. >> susie: uh-huh. beyond stocks, give us your thoughts on bonds, on gold, and other commodities. >> i think go
for president bill clinton, one that the republicans put out yesterday, and it's one that democrats roundly rejected. >> republicans' plan, on the other hand, is more of the same. not only does it balance the budget on the backs of the middle class, but voids the promise to seniors with cuts to social security and medicare all to pay for handouts to the rich. at least we know where they stand. >> republicans are willing to make sure we don't go over the cliff, but, at the same time, don't harm the economy. what has to happen, the president needs to show leadership, sit in the room, stay here, get it done. that's why there was a proposal that's reasonable, meets his criteria. >> republicans say they have put a bipartisan plan forward. it's up to the white house to come back with their next proposal. the white house and democrats are saying republicans need to be willing to raise tax rates on families earning more than $250,000 a year as a prerequisite before talking about any of these structural changes that republicans want. back to you. dennis: thank you, rich edson, and the deadlock conti
problems. we firmly believe in this. i find it interesting that secretary clinton's last visit to the continent she expanded on that and said, yes, african solutions to african challenges but we need african solutions ss and participation in global challenges as well and that's a recognition of the evolving nature of things in africa. there are two documents that broadly guide what we do in africa, and those, i would commend -- probably most of you have probably read them. the first is the presidential policy directive for subsaharaan africa, and it is based on four pillars. the first, to promote opportunity and development. secondly. to spur economic growth, trade and investment. thirdly, to advance peace and security. and fourth, to strengthen democratic institutions. insurprisingly, we at u.s. a africa command focus on the third, building peace and security. but as a necessary precondition to achieving the other four objectives. so, again, i think it's best to think of us in, again, a supporting and enabling role. the second document that guide our principles as the defense
to clinton rates for top earners. that is nearly 40% on amounts of more than $250,000 a year. republicans have put $800 billion of unspecified tax revenue on the table but they're saying no to a tax rate increase. democrats have said no to that proposal.% in response to that a spokesman for house speaker john boehner saying despite republicans offer to put real revenue on the table the president has offered no concessions whatsoever. when will this willingness to compromise materialize??3 now republicans and democrats say there are no major meetings planned, no summit for democrats and republicans yet to get together and talk on this. the white house says they imagine that there is some e-mail traffic going back and forth but they refuse to tell us when and where they plan on negotiating this. back to you. ashley: i bet the language in the e-mail is pretty interesting too. >> right. ashley: rich edson, thanks so much. tracy: well more companies are accelerating their dividend payments. so we heard from campbell's soup and coach. some of the latest getting cash to shareholders ahead of fis
, and then you have christie. and then could be bush versus clinton again. >> governor, thank you very much. appreciate your time. >> honor to be with you. >> right now it's time for "squawk on the street." ♪ >> good tuesday morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm melissa lee with carl quintanilla, jim cramer and david faber. we're live from post 9 at the new york stock exchange. a vacuum here in terms of u.s. economic data. none on top today. we're looking at a flat open across the board. as for europe, movement there. the buyback of greek debt will in fact work. we're seeing just fractions of a percent in terms of changes there. our road map this morning starts with the latest in the fiscal cliff negotiations. the white house promptly rebuffs the gop counterproposal which calls for $800 billion in new tax revenue but without tax rate increases for the wealthy. could this tax issue deadlock the talks? >>> bank of america ceo warns the cliff must get stalled or the economy could be stifled well into 2014. >>> even more dividends pushed into 2012. coach, american eagle moving up an
-- a return. it is similar to what the former clinton chief of staff -- separate from that commission, he testified before the super committee last year and put forward his own proposal to try to break the impasse at that time. republicans say their current offer is not in that proposal, so it is not the simpsons-bowles plan that has gotten a lot of talk over the last few years, but it is modeled on a proposal from a leading democrat during these discussions, so they are hoping it will give some credibility going forward. the $800 billion they are offering is not the same as what john boehner offered in 2007. -- is the same as what john boehner offered in 2007. they will not accept any deal that keeps tax rates the same as well. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> you can read his proposal online by going to c-span.org and clicking to the lake. oklahoma congressman tom cole discusses the fiscal cliff negotiations and agrees with suggestions they should join president obama to extend the tax rates for the highest income earners the law professor john buckley looks at the history of the tax, plu
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)